On the Syllabus: My Favorite College Reads, Part Two

Last week, I wrote a post about my favorite assigned college reading. (Thanks again to Megan at Hepburn’s Pixie Crop for the idea!) But that post featured a pretty gaping hole: not a single book from my major! That’s because Art History assigned reading is generally articles or chapters, not books. So today I’m finishing up Part Two of ‘On the Syllabus’ with a list of my favorite academic books that applied to various research projects of mine. Instead of dividing these by rating, as I did with the fiction and poetry books in Part One, I’m loosely dividing them up by subject. Dive into an already familiar topic or tackle something new, (some of these research assignments definitely made me step into new territory!)

On the Syllabus: My Favorite College Reads, Part Two | Strawberry Moon Books

Women’s Studies/Women’s History. Although I was an Art History major, not a WGS major, I seemed to refer back to these types of books an awful lot. New Woman Hybridities, in particular, is one of my favorites.

Fairytales. I swear I didn’t intend for this all to be Zipes but there it is.

Artist Biographies and Catalogs

Other Historical Volumes

Whew! That’s a lot of heavy reading right there but definitely some gems. Anything here you would eat up? What about your own favorite academic volumes?

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5 thoughts on “On the Syllabus: My Favorite College Reads, Part Two

  1. I can’t say I had a ton of books that I loved—I was a linguistics and communications double major so it was mostly textbooks. BUT, some of the linguistics textbooks were fun! We had an assignment where we had to go to the library to use the Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language for a project…and…I asked my mom to buy it for me for Christmas… 😀

    I also took a class on Jane Austen my senior year as an elective, so of course I loved those books as well as most of the others we read in the class.

      1. Not really daunting at all—what was so cool about it was each subject had its own dedicated two-page spread with easy-to-digest info. There’s also the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, which I don’t have, but covet dearly.

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